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I am many things – a doctor of psychology, occupational psychologist, trained coach, consultant, mediator, NLP practitioner, development consultant, a writer, a partner, step-mother by deed rather than marriage documents, small-time property developer, sailor and boat lover. I try to be sassy, clever and funny but often end up grumpy and snarly when I see women held back – either by themselves or by ‘experts’. I am 54. I would like to be a size 12 and I dye my hair. I also try to be a friend, a thinker, an advisor. My best days are when someone says I have made a difference to their confidence or their career and helped them make a positive shift in their mind, body or soul. But truth to tell, I am just like you – a woman who fights to keep her Sassy side live.

This blog will not tell you my daily coming and going (far too dull) or the clothes that I wear (far too conservative until I retire). It will be a weekly observation on what has made my Sassy side scream, cheer, laugh, think or shout.
 

Strong women and imposter syndrome

Last week I was I my element – surrounded by a group of sassy, strong women who had made it in life. I was speaking at a conference for woman lawyers from all over Europe and the subject was very simple – them and their potential.

Our first Staying Sassy seminar!

This week saw the first of our Sassy seminars – ‘45 and very much alive’. I faced a pretty tough audience – twenty very independent, strong and feisty women from the London Welsh Club. My audience ranged from 45 to 85 and not a shrinking violet amongst them.

Westminster, sexual abuse, harassment, abuse of power and what it will mean for women in the workplace

First let’s be very clear on where I stand: Any man or woman who uses their political or physical power to intimidate, harass or harm another person for their own gratification deserves the full weight of the law to come down upon them and the full weight of their colleagues against them. 

Sexual harassment on public transport and why we do not call it out

This week the BBC 100 Women initiative has been in the news for their work on preventing sexual harassment on public transport. We have all heard about terrible attacks such as the rape and ultimately murder of Jyoti Singh on an Indian bus,

Harvey Weinstein, sexual bullying, and why we need to call it out

There is no escaping the ever more lurid allegations coming out of Hollywood and the American Media about Harvey Weinstein’s stomach turning assaults on young actresses and other women in his empire. We all have heard tales of the casting couch in which fat, balding, never-to-be-fancied men, use their power and the woman’s desperation for success as a vile cocktail for abuse.

Laura Kuenssberg, threats and the cult of Corbyn

Some years ago now, I had a fascinating dinner party conversation with a man from BBC news. He was not a ‘front-liner’ donning flak jackets and heading for the danger zone. Instead he was the man in the office who did all the planning and decision making to keep television journalists safe.

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